Upcoming Teacher Professional Development

All professional development align with Common Core State Standards.


Modern Antisemitism: Past and Present

Thursday, January 26, 2017 | 4:30-8:00pm

3rd – 12th grade educators

Antisemitism, also known as “the longest hatred”, has had a disastrous impact on the history of the Jewish people. From centuries of Christian anti-Judaism, through the origins of modern antisemitism in 19th Century Europe, hostility against Jews would lead directly to the Holocaust. Join IHMEC and Dr. Tim Crain, Director, National Catholic Center for Holocaust Education, Seton Hill University, as we review the history of antisemitism, with particular focus on the 20th century, the post World War II era, and the present day. Through the use of collaborative discussion, textual analysis, and powerful stories from multiple perspectives, participants will be provided with a toolkit of strategies that promote critical thinking to address the sometimes challenging learning of this topic, and what it means for their students’ today.

Workshop includes:

  • 3.5 Clock Hours (IL)
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Confronting Bias: Facilitating Difficult Conversations In The Classroom

Thursday, February 9 | 9:00am-2:30pm

3rd – 12th grade educators

Join Illinois Holocaust Museum and Teaching Tolerance to explore commonly held beliefs and biases that influence an educator’s ability to be responsive to all students. Engage in personal reflection, explore strategies for facilitating difficult conversations, plan student-centered instruction, and investigate ways to include teaching about race, racism, and police violence in your academic instruction. Educators, administrators, and counselors in grades 3-12 are encouraged to attend. Participants will receive “use tomorrow” classroom resources and publications from Teaching Tolerance, a project of the Southern Poverty Law Center.

Workshop includes:

  • 5 Clock Hours (IL), 5 PGPs (IN)
  • Breakfast and Lunch
  • Classroom Resources
  • Free Registration
  • Substitute Reimbursement Available (Request must be submitted in advance of workshop)
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What Does Justice Look Like? Eichmann and Beyond

Wednesday, February 22, 2017| 9:00am – 2:30pm

7th – 12th grade educators

Adolf Eichmann’s capture by Israeli agents in Argentina in May1960 and his subsequent trial in Jerusalem by an Israeli court electrified the world. The Eichmann Trial served as a touchstone for a world that until then never fully understood what the millions who died in the Holocaust and the hundreds of thousands who managed to survive had actually experienced. Over a half a century later, the legacy of Eichmann’s capture and controversial trial continues to have an enormous impact on public consciousness and the universal legal standards of justice and accountability during and after the Holocaust.

Join Illinois Holocaust Museum as we introduce participants to one of the chief perpetrators of the Nazis’ “Final Solution;” his trial that became a watershed moment in how the world in general and Holocaust survivors in particular found the means to begin to deal with the legacy of genocide on a scale that had never been seen before; and the examination of the universal response to justice, punishment, and the prevention of genocide and atrocity crime. In the aftermath of genocide, what does justice look like, and whom does justice serve? Participants will engage in collaborative discussion and activities that will examine multiple perspectives, extend their thinking on the aftermath of the Holocaust and concepts of justice, and make connections through testimonies from survivors, perpetrators, and eyewitnesses in order to empower their students to actively engage with this history.

Workshop includes:

  • 5 Clock Hours (IL) and 5 PGPs (IN)
  • Breakfast and Lunch
  • Classroom Resources and Materials
  • Tour of Special Exhibition – “Operation Finale: The Capture and Trial of Adolf Eichmann”
  • Substitute Reimbursement Available (Request must be submitted in advance of workshop)
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The Genocide of Greeks of the Asia Minor: 1913 – 1923

Thursday, March 9, 2017 | 9:00am-2:30pm

While many of us teach about the Armenian genocide, few today know what happened to the Greeks of Asia Minor, as well as to the Assyrians, who together lost more than a million people as part of one of first large-scale genocides of the 20th century, which Ottoman Turkey committed against its Christian minorities. Join IHMEC and The Asian Minor and Pontos Hellenic Research Center as we equip participants to return to their classrooms with deeper knowledge of the genocide, learning why, how, what, when, and where the genocide of the Greeks of the Asia Minor took place, including key historical antecedents that led up to the atrocities, as well as the aftermath and denial that still takes place.

Through the analysis and evaluation of primary sources, including survivor narratives, interactive text and graphics, and diaries, participants will actively engage in a direct connection with the reflections of those involved in the genocide, and bring a more personal dimension to this often forgotten history.

Workshop includes:

  • FREE copy of the Teaching Guide, “The Genocide of the Ottoman Greeks: 1914-1923
  • FREE copy of Not Even My Name, by Thea Halo
  • 5 Clock Hours (IL) and 5 PGPs (IN)
  • Breakfast and Lunch
  • Substitute Reimbursement Available (Request must be submitted in advance of workshop)
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Bring History Alive with Activities, Programs, and Documents from the National Archives

Tuesday, May 9, 2017 | 9:00am – 3:00pm

Primary sources teach and reinforce historical thinking skills. The National Archives holds thousands of digitized documents from World War II and the Holocaust. Join IHMEC and Missy McNatt, Education Specialist, National Archives and Records Administration, to learn how to turn students into historians using primary source documents from the World War II era to create activities that engage and motivate students. Explore, discover and create activities on DocsTeach, the online tool for teaching with documents, from the National Archives. Participate in a compelling experience exploring the U.S. Constitution by interacting with primary sources from the World War II era to discover real-life examples of the Constitution in action. Find out how you and your students can visit the National Archives without leaving your classroom and about professional development opportunities.

Workshop includes:

  • 5.5 Clock Hours (IL) and 5.5 PGPs (IN)
  • Breakfast and Lunch
  • Classroom Resources and Materials
  • Substitute Reimbursement Available (Request must be submitted in advance of workshop)
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Common Core State Standards:

The goal of the Illinois Holocaust Museum and Education Center’s Education Department is to offer the best training opportunities for teachers in grades 3-12 and to assist them in any way possible. Common Core Standards define what all students are expected to know and be able to do, not how teachers should teach. The standards lay out goals for student learning for each grade level; it is up to teachers and administrators to decide on the curriculum and teaching strategies that will help all students meet these ambitious goals. Our teacher training addresses standards in both English Language Arts and Literacy in History/Social Studies. We offer a diverse collection of instructional materials and trainings for teachers. We include the use of classroom-tested strategies and share many of the same goals as CCSS, including the ability for students to comprehend a range of challenging texts, engage in collaborative discussion, analyze the purpose of information presented in diverse formats and media, to name just a few. As a part of our interaction with educators we consistently address CCSS and we encourage teachers to identify those materials that fit their own needs for teaching about character education, the Holocaust and other genocides while helping them develop the student skills outlines in the standards, as well as skills not covered in the standards.

The Illinois Holocaust Museum is a Center of Excellence of the Jewish Foundation for the Righteous and a National Training Site for Echoes and Reflections.

 

 

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