Upcoming Teacher Professional Development

All professional development align with Common Core State Standards. Unless otherwise noted, all workshops are for educators in grades 7 and up. If you have any dietary restrictions, please make note of it in your application.


Inquiry as Engagement:  Empowering Students to Take a Stand!

Thursday, September 27, 2018 | 4:30 pm – 7:30 pm

For Grades K-12

Presented in Partnership with McCormick Foundation and illinoiscivics.org

The new Illinois Social Science Standards require students to address essential questions to scaffold inquiry that leads to informed action.  Explore the new, immersive Take a Stand Center and learn how to empower your classroom with knowledge and inspiration to stand against hatred in all its forms.  Walk away with free resources aligned to the inquiry arc that inspire students to promote social justice.

Explicit connections will be made to the Common Core State Standards, Social Emotional Learning Competencies and the Danielson Framework for Effective Teaching.

Workshop Includes:

  • Dinner
  • Classroom resources and materials
  • 3 Clock Hours/CPDUs

This workshop is currently at capacity 


Stories of Survival: Teaching Through Object, Image and Memory

Sunday, October 14, 2018| 6:30 pm -9:00 pm

For Jewish Sunday and Day School Educators

Whether a family heirloom, childhood toy, or photograph, seemingly ordinary objects can become storytellers representing shared experiences. Objects can reflect home, culture, and religious practice, but they can also reflect the impact of war, trauma, displacement, exile and immigration.  Join IHMEC, Rabbi Aaron Leibtag, Hillel Torah North Suburban Day, and Rabbi Yakov Danishefsky, Ida Crown Jewish Academy , as we explore the Museum’s special exhibition, Stories of Survival: Object. Image. Memory. With more than 60 personal artifacts brought to America by Survivors of the Holocaust and genocides, the exhibition explores the relationship between objects, their meaning to the original owner and subsequent significance, as well as each artifact dramatically paired with oversized photographs by renowned documentarian Jim Lommasson with handwritten responses by Survivors or their family members. Working with a specially developed Student and Teacher Pre and Post Visit Exhibition Guide, participants will receive a toolkit of strategies to engage their students’ in the Stories of Survival exhibition, and the themes and lessons presented through personal reflection, collaborative discussion, and textual and photographic analysis.

Workshop Includes:

  • Kosher Dinner
  • Classroom resources and materials
  • Tour of Stories of Survival: Object, Image, and Memory
  • 2 CPDUs


Making the Holocaust Relevant in the Classroom – Teaching Jewish Armed Resistance

Tuesday, October 23, 2018 | 4:30 pm – 7:30 pm

Presented in partnership with Jewish Partisan Educational  Foundation (JPEF)

The number one question students ask when learning the Holocaust is “Why didn’t the Jews fight back?”. Teaching about the approximately 30,000 Jews who fought back in organized armed resistance groups, known as partisans, is part of the answer. This workshop will explain the origins of partisan groups, what they accomplished, differences between Jewish and non-Jewish groups and some of the ethical dilemmas these guerrilla fighters dealt with – from stealing to killing. The workshop will use JPEF short documentary films featuring Jewish partisans, and JPEF’s printed study guides, including those on the films “Defiance” and “Uprising”, as well as providing tools to understand resistance to aggression in any situation, exploring symmetrical and asymmetrical responses, and their consequences. All participants will receive JPEF printed materials and films on DVD.

Workshop Includes:

  • Dinner
  • Classroom resources and materials
  • 3 Clock Hours/CPDUs

 


Response and Resistance During Ghettoization: An Echoes and Reflections Workshop

November 8, 2018 | 9:00 am – 2:30 pm

Between the walls, chaos, and inhumanity of the ghettos in occupied-Europe, we must also help our students understand that Jews responded and resisted to this unprecedented reality in a variety of ways and were not merely passive objects of persecution.  Even in the darkness of the ghettos, with the most limited resources, many Jews actively strove to maintain their dignity, education, culture, and even hope in humanity. Join IHMEC and Stephanie Kaye, International School for Holocaust Studies, Yad Vashem, as we explore the history and human story behind this complex history through the use of testimony, diary excerpts, memoirs and readings.  Echoes and Reflections resources will provide participants with a toolkit of strategies to bring back to their classroom to stimulate engagement and critical thinking in their students, and help them meaningfully integrate this narrative into their classrooms

Workshop Includes:

  • Breakfast and Lunch
  • Classroom resources and materials
  • 5 Clock Hours/CPDUs

 

 


Postcards & Letters: Using Primary Sources to Teach the Holocaust

Thursday, November 15, 2018 | 4:30 -7:30 pm

As educators we strive to give the past meaning for our students. Holocaust-era postcards and letters—seemingly ordinary, everyday objects—reveal both a historical and human understanding of this complex history. We see their authors as real people faced with the unimaginable, often reaching out in desperation to others in hopes of receiving help, encouragement, or simply news that a loved one was still alive. Join IHMEC, Dr. Justin Gordon, Holocaust postal historian, and Jennifer Murtoff, educational materials developer, as you learn to integrate these unique and invaluable primary resources into the classroom. This session will provide an overview of the Holocaust, using actual correspondence written by the victims to document the steps along the way, and provide strategies and approaches to incorporate these primary source materials into your curriculum. Teachers will receive a copy of the book Holocaust Postal History: Harrowing Journeys Revealed Through the Letters and Cards of the Victims and sample lessons and materials from the accompanying teacher resource supplement.

Workshop Includes:

  • Non-Kosher Dinner 
  • Classroom resources and materials
  • 3 Clock Hours or CPDUs


History, Holocaust, and Human Rights in the Global Classroom: A Centropa Seminar

Thursday, December 6, 2018 | 8:00 am – 4:00 pm

Centropa (www.centropa.org) brings history to life by making it personal through the interviews and old family photographs of 1,200 elderly Jews they interviewed in Central and Eastern Europe between 2000 and 2010. Join IHMEC and Lauren Granite, Centropa’s US Education Director, for a full-day workshop exploring Centropa’s database of over 700 interviews; 22,000 old photographs of 20th century European Jewish life; 60 short, multimedia and award-winning films telling their most compelling stories; and dozens of teacher-designed, classroom tested lesson plans. Topics include: an introduction to Centropa’s interviews, photographs, and films; the Spanish roots of Southeast Europe – stories of Sephardic Jewish life in the Balkans; a story of real-life civic engagement during the Bosnian war of the 1990s, when the Jews opened their synagogue to Muslims, Croats, and Serbs as they worked together to survive the siege of Sarajevo; and Holocaust-related stories from Centropa interviewees, such as those times when friends and neighbors first turned against them, and stories of when friends, neighbors, and even strangers offered a helping hand.

Workshop Includes:

  • Non-Kosher Breakfast and Lunch
  • Classroom resources and materials
  • 7 Clock Hours/CPDUs


America & the Holocaust

Thursday, February 7, 2019 | 4:30 – 7:30 pm

During the 1930s and 1940s, many Americans had access to information about the dangers of Nazism, but such awareness seldom translated into action to help Europe’s endangered Jews. Why didn’t knowledge of the Nazi regime’s persecution and violence lead to greater political and popular will to help those who were in danger? How did the US government balance domestic and national security concerns with pleas to aid threatened peoples abroad? How did Americans’ own fears and insecurities shape their responses to Nazism? Join IHMEC and Dr. Daniel Greene, Adjust Professor of History at Northwestern and Guest Curator of “Americans and the Holocaust” special exhibition at the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum in Washington, DC, as we explore these difficult questions about Americans’ responses to Nazism and the Holocaust. Learn strategies for approaching this complex history through activities and collaborative discussion focused on promoting critical thinking and civic literacy skills.

Workshop Includes:

  • Non-Kosher Dinner 
  • Classroom resources and materials
  • 3 Clock Hours or CPDUs


Purchased Lives: The American Slave Trade from 1801 to 1865

Wednesday, February 13, 2019 | 10:00 AM – 2:30 PM

In 1808, the international slave trade was abolished, ending the export of people to the Americas.  The domestic slave trade continued until the end of the Civil War in 1865.  For 57 years the domestic slave trade continued in New Orleans becoming the largest slave market in Antebellum America. Curated by the Historic New Orleans Collection, IHMEC special exhibition, Purchased Lives: The American Slave Trade From 1808 to 1865, includes more than 75 original items, including period broadsides, paintings and prints illustrating the domestic slave trade, ship manifests and first-person accounts from slave narratives and oral histories. The display also includes a collection of “Lost Friends” ads placed after the Civil War by newly freed people attempting to locate family members. Three interactive displays will allow visitors to engage directly with the historical record, including a database tracking the shipment of more than 70,000 people to New Orleans from other US ports. 

Join IHMEC and Jenny Schwartzberg, Curator of Education, The Historic New Orleans Collection, for a thought-provoking workshop that will expand both content knowledge, as well as build a toolkit of resources through curriculum units specifically developed for the exhibition examining this dark period in American history through primary and secondary sources.

Workshop Includes:

  • Non-Kosher Lunch
  • Tour of Purchased Lives exhibition
  • Resources and Materials Including:
    • “Solomon Northup: A Purchased Life” Curriculum Unit
    • “Purchased Lives: Torn Apart and Stitched Back Together” Curriculum Unit
  • 4 Clock Hours/CPDUs

 

 


Talking to Elementary School Students about Identity, Bias, and Bigotry

Tuesday, February 26, 2019 | 9:00 am – 2:30 pm

For Grades 3-6

Public discourse about race, racism, and other forms of bigotry has increased in volume and intensity in recent years, and events such as Charlottesville, Ferguson, and the Orlando Pulse shooting have attuned elementary school students to these issues in ways that adults and teachers may not anticipate. In this full-day workshop, educators will join facilitators from the Anti-Defamation League’s A World Of Difference® Institute and the Illinois Holocaust Museum & Education Center to discuss best practices for talking about race, racism, and other forms of bigotry in the younger grades.  Explore the development and impact of prejudice in children, strategies for engaging young people in conversations about race and racism, and tools and lesson plans for creating a bias-free environment in our schools and classrooms.  The session will include a guided visit to the special exhibition, Purchased Lives: The American Slave Trade from 1808-1865.

Workshop Includes:

  • Non-Kosher Breakfast and Lunch
  • Classroom resources and materials
  • 5 Clock Hours or CPDUs

Presented in partnership with the Anti-Defamation League


Legacies: Purchased Lives

Thursday, February 28, 2019 | 9:00 am-2:30 pm

Presented in partnership with Facing History and Ourselves

A one-day workshop, held on February 28, 2019, will explore the transatlantic slave trade and its legacies, using the “Purchased Lives” exhibit at the IHMEC as its foundation.  In this workshop, through resources and teaching strategies, Facing History will  support educators (and their students) in exploring this difficult history and its legacies today. Using sources from Illinois Holocaust Museum’s special exhibition “Purchased Lives”, Facing History will look at themes of identity and belonging, investigating the origins of concepts of race, and how flawed assumptions led to justification for inhumane treatment and enslavement of others. With emphases on both civic engagement and decision-making, we will consider choices made by both perpetrators of injustice, as well as those who resisted those injustices.  Though legal slavery ended with the 13th Amendment in 1865, we consider the legacies during the Reconstruction Era and beyond, and how four million formerly enslaved people grappled with freedom, and the United States sought to practice a more inclusive, interracial democracy. Looking to today, we consider how the legacies of these histories impact our lives, and the choices we make. 

Workshop Includes:

  • Non-Kosher Breakfast and Lunch
  • Classroom resources and materials
  • 5 Clock Hours or CPDUs


A Complicated Legacy: Genocide and Mass Violence

March 20-21, 2019 |  9:00 am-2:30 pm

Presented in partnership with Facing History and Ourselves

A two-day workshop investigating mass violence, genocide and its legacies will be held on March 20-21, 2019, at the Illinois Holocaust Museum and Education Center, to support Chicago-area middle and high school educators. Through resources and teaching strategies emphasizing civic engagement and social emotional learning, Illinois Holocaust Museum in partnership with Facing History will explore how to teach about these difficult histories, as well as their legacies today. The workshop will provide a framework to understand the ways group membership functions, and how we understand our sense of responsibility towards others. Participants will examine case studies of both the Nanking Massacre (1937-1938), and  Rwandan Genocide (1994),  considering choices made: by perpetrators of injustice; by those who were bystanders; and by those who  were upstanders and resisted those injustices.  After considering issues of judgment and accountability in the wake of mass violence (from the Tokyo Trials to the ICC), we will consider our own roles in fostering inclusive, upstanding civic participation. 

 

Workshop Includes:

  • Non-Kosher Breakfast and Lunch
  • Classroom Resources and Materials
  • 10 Clock Hours/ CPDUs

 

 


Origins of the “Final Solution”: The Psychology of Perpetrators

Tuesday, March 26, 2019 |  9:00 am – 2:30 pm

Location: Illinois Education Association, 500 Plaza Drive, Suite 5, Carterville, IL

Approximately, 5.4 million Eastern European Jews died under Nazi occupation. Nearly half of them were murdered in eastern Poland and the former Soviet Union, usually by bullets, sometimes by gas. What changed the attitude of the Nazis in regards to the Eastern European Jews between 1941 and 1942? Join us as we explore the origins of the Final Solution and the role of the Einsatzgruppen (mobile killing squads) in eastern Poland and the former Soviet Union. Learn what made the mass murder of Jews in the East different from Nazi occupied territories in West. Uncover the history and put into context the overall destruction which led to a more efficient method of killing. Through textual analysis, educators will examine motivations and choices of those who participated in the killings and collaborated with the Nazis. Come away with resources and implementation strategies that promote critical thinking about individual choice and aspects of human behavior.

Workshop Includes:

  • Non-Kosher Breakfast and Lunch
  • Classroom resources and materials
  • 5 Clock Hours or CPDUs


Diaries and Memoirs: Using Primary Sources to Teach the Holocaust

Wednesday, March 27, 2019 | 9:00 am – 2:00 pm

Location: Illinois Education Association, 3440 Liberty Drive, Springfield, IL

As educators we strive to give the past meaning for our students. Diaries and memoirs are essential tools in teaching the Holocaust, helping our students to develop both a historical and a human understanding of this complex history. This session will provide an overview of how to use these invaluable primary source records in your classroom and provide strategies and approaches to incorporate into your curriculum. Teachers will also receive an introduction to the resources of Illinois Holocaust Museum & Education Center for both educators and students.

Workshop Includes:

  • Non-Kosher Breakfast and Lunch
  • Classroom resources and materials
  • 4 Clock Hours or CPDUs


Common Core State Standards:

The goal of the Illinois Holocaust Museum and Education Center’s Education Department is to offer the best training opportunities for teachers in grades 3-12 and to assist them in any way possible. Common Core Standards define what all students are expected to know and be able to do, not how teachers should teach. The standards lay out goals for student learning for each grade level; it is up to teachers and administrators to decide on the curriculum and teaching strategies that will help all students meet these ambitious goals. Our teacher training addresses standards in both English Language Arts and Literacy in History/Social Studies. We offer a diverse collection of instructional materials and trainings for teachers. We include the use of classroom-tested strategies and share many of the same goals as CCSS, including the ability for students to comprehend a range of challenging texts, engage in collaborative discussion, analyze the purpose of information presented in diverse formats and media, to name just a few. As a part of our interaction with educators we consistently address CCSS and we encourage teachers to identify those materials that fit their own needs for teaching about character education, the Holocaust and other genocides while helping them develop the student skills outlines in the standards, as well as skills not covered in the standards.

The Illinois Holocaust Museum is a Center of Excellence of the Jewish Foundation for the Righteous and a National Training Site for Echoes and Reflections.

 

 

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