Open Wed-Sun, 10 AM - 5 PM

Middle School Field Trips

Through on-site and virtual field trips of our Zev & Shifra Karkomi Holocaust Exhibition, Make a Difference! The Harvey L. Miller Family Youth Exhibition, and Act of Art gallery, fifth and sixth-grade students are invited to reflect on how they can act – both individually and as a group – to make a difference and inspire ongoing dialogue on their responsibility to others as part of a diverse global community. Pre and post-visit activities allow educators to extend their students’ learning.

(On-Site) Be An Upstander

Available for grades 6-12. Recommended for grade 6, or grade 7-8 with limited background knowledge.

Group Size: 10 students minimum, 80 students maximum
Times Offered: Monday – Friday | 9:45 AM, 1:45 PM
Tour Length: 2 hours, 40 minutes

Students develop skills to use their voices to speak out for themselves and on behalf of others, and are empowered to take positive action in their schools and communities. Through experiential and interactive activities exploring the compelling stories of Holocaust Survivors and contemporary Upstanders, students will gain a deeper understanding of:

  • Universal human rights
  • Civil rights
  • Empowering and creating community
  • Social justice
  • Social-emotional learning
  • Age-appropriate introductory Holocaust education

Be an Upstander field trips include tours of the Abe & Ida Cooper Survivor Stories Experience and the Act of Art gallery, or a special exhibition (when age-appropriate).

This field trip supports Illinois Priority Learning Standards for Social/Emotional Learning and the Illinois Civics Mandate for Middle School.

(On-Site) Make A Difference!

Available for grades 5-12. Recommended for grade 5, or grade 6-7 with limited background knowledge.

Group Size: 10 students minimum, 80 students maximum
Times Offered: Monday – Friday | 9:45 AM, 1:45 PM
Tour Length: 2 hours, 20 minutes

Students will be inspired by contemporary and historic Upstanders who have taken action on issues that matter to them. Through experiential and interactive activities, students will develop skills to speak out and get involved in their local and global communities while gaining a deeper understanding of:

  • Universal human rights
  • Civil rights
  • Empowering and creating community
  • Social justice
  • Social-emotional learning
  • Age-appropriate introductory Holocaust education

Make a Difference field trips include tours of the Act of Art gallery or a special exhibition (when age-appropriate).

This field trip supports Illinois Priority Learning Standards.

(Virtual) Make a Difference! Field Trip

Available for grades 5-12. Recommended for grades 5-6.

Experiential technology, online interactives, and compelling stories of Holocaust Survivors encourage students to explore their role in empowering and creating community through the lens of universal human and civil rights. Online activities may be completed individually, as a class, or a combination of the two. Options available within the field trip allow educators to focus on essential themes, including:

  • Social justice
  • Social/emotional learning
  • Contemporary Upstanders
  • Age-appropriate introductory Holocaust education

This field trip supports Illinois Priority Learning Standards for social/emotional learning and the Illinois Civics Mandate for middle schools.

(On-Site & Virtual) Mandela: Struggle for Freedom Field Trip

Available virtually and on-site for grades 6+ through September 12, 2021.

Group Size: 10 students minimum, 80 students maximum
Times Offered: Monday – Friday | 10:00 AM, 12:00 PM, 2:00 PM
Tour Length: 1 hour, 30 minutes

Through a rich sensory experience of images, music, digital media and objects, our virtual and on-site field trips of Mandela: Struggle for Freedom trace the history of the fight against apartheid in South Africa, with Nelson Mandela as one of its central figures. Through the themes of apartheid, defiance, repression, mobilization and freedom, students will follow Mandela into hiding as he is declared an outlaw, through his imprisonment and bittersweet joy of his release after 27 long years.

Students will be empowered by learning about South Africa’s first democratic elections, Mandela’s efforts to rebuild a nation shattered by racism and injustice, and even local Chicagoans who joined the struggle for freedom and equality.

On-site field trips include a tour of the Take a Stand Center. Virtual field trips are pre-recorded. There is an optional add-on live Q&A session with a Museum docent.

(On-Site & Virtual) Rise Up: Stonewall and the LGBTQ Rights Movement Field Trip

Available virtually and on-site for grades 6+ through May 8, 2022.

This field trip supports Illinois State Mandates for Teaching LGBTQ History and Civic Education.

On-site Group Size: 10 students minimum, 80 students maximum
On-site Times Offered: Monday – Friday | 10:00 AM, 12:00 PM, 2:00 PM
Tour Length: 1 hour, 50 minutes

Through 85 powerful artifacts, images and historic print publications, the Rise Up: Stonewall and the LGBTQ Rights Movement field trip explores key moments of gay rights history, including the 1978 assassination of Harvey Milk, one of the country’s first openly gay elected officials; the AIDS crisis; the efforts for hate crime legislation; the implementation and later repeal of “don’t ask, don’t tell”; and the fight for marriage equality.

Student’s will come away with a deeper understanding of popular culture’s role in influencing attitudes about the LGBTQ community through film, television and sports, and how the gay rights movement harnessed the five freedoms of the 1st Amendment to change laws and shatter stereotypes.

Newseum.

(On-Site & Virtual) Shanghai: Safe Haven During the Holocaust Field Trip

Available virtually and on-site for grades 6+ through May 8, 2022.

On-site Group Size: 10 students minimum, 80 students maximum
On-site Times Offered: Monday – Friday | 10:00 AM, 12:00 PM, 2:00 PM
Tour Length: 1 hour, 30 minutes

Shanghai: Safe Haven During the Holocaust sheds light on a lesser-known moment in Holocaust history. European Jews who had been shut out of country after country while trying to escape Nazi persecution found a beacon of hope in an unlikely place: Shanghai, China. In 1946, American photojournalist Arthur Rothstein began a project documenting the lives of Jewish refugees who now called Shanghai’s Hongkew District “home.”

Featuring a mix of Rothstein’s photographs and personal artifacts from local Holocaust Survivors who lived in the Shanghai ghetto, students will have the opportunity to delve deeper into this lesser-known moment of Holocaust history while also examining the enormous hardship and fierce perseverance of refugees and their families as they managed to not only survive, but thrive.

Heim on Chaoufoong Road. Hongkew, Shanghai, China. April 1946. Photo by Arthur Rothstein.

Photo credits: CMHR Aaron Cohen; Danyel Duncan; Scott Edwards

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