Illinois Holocaust Museum Mourns Death of Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg

 

According to Jewish tradition, a person who dies on Rosh Hashanah, which began tonight, is a person of great righteousness. That is certainly true of Justice Ginsburg.

“As an institution, we have been lucky enough to be telling her remarkable story for the last 7 months, whether in person in our Notorious RBG: The Life and Times of Ruth Bader Ginsburg exhibition or virtually,” says VP of Education and Exhibitions, Kelley Szany. “She has become a friend to us.”

Ruth Bader Ginsburg was an amazing woman, full of spunk and grace and a quiet yet steely determination. She came of age in a time that was not supportive of women and the role they play in society. She fought discrimination at Harvard Law and when trying to find a job.

When she volunteered at the ACLU and saw the many challenges faced by women through their letters, it informed her life’s work. She used the law as a vehicle for change. And to reinforce the tenet that all people are created equal.

Her commitment to changing society was consistent and deliberate, and she argued case after case with the underlying theme that people should not be defined by their sex.

RBG was not just an attorney and judge, but a woman of huge heart, giant vision, and remarkable work ethic. She also became a cultural icon, gaining the attention and respect of so many through her humor, workouts, and fashion sense, using her collars to indicate her point of view for Supreme court decisions.

“While we will continue to tell RBG’s story at our Museum through January, we will always be inspired by her and will work to build on her legacy in the ongoing fight for human rights,” says Museum CEO Susan Abrams.

 
 

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