Upcoming Teacher Professional Development

All professional development align with Common Core State Standards.

 

Overlapping Triangles: Teaching About Non-Jewish Victims of Nazism

Wednesday, January 28, 2015, 10:00 – 2:30pm

For 7th through 12th grade educators

Location: University Center, 525 S. State Street, Chicago

Alongside the Jewish victims of the Holocaust, the Nazi regime persecuted and murdered Roma and Sinti (“Gypsies”), the mentally and physically disabled, homosexuals, political dissidents, and many other social and racial groups. Yet these “other victims” are often excluded from Holocaust education and commemoration. Join Dr. Danny M. Cohen, Assistant Professor of Instruction, School of Education & Social Policy at Northwestern University, for the premiere of a new curriculum, Overlapping Triangles.

Overlapping Triangles is a free, interdisciplinary curriculum focusing on themes of prejudice, hidden histories, and social action. Providing a framework for integrating the many victim groups of Nazism alongside and within the Jewish Holocaust narrative, the curriculum also addresses the ongoing persecution of those same communities today. Made up of short learner-centered activities, as well as a new text for young adults, the historical thriller TRAIN, Overlapping Triangles can be easily adapted for time, grade level, and course subject.

Participants will receive full access to Overlapping Triangles resources. Engage and use the different parts of the curriculum and learn how to adapt them for your classroom. Increase your confidence in teaching about Holocaust history by exploring new pedagogical guidelines.

Featuring: Danny M. Cohen Ph. D., learning scientist, fiction writer, and education designer, Northwestern University

Workshop Includes:
5 CPDUs
Light breakfast and vegetarian style lunch
Classroom resources and materials
Registration Fee: Free

RegisterHereButton copy

 

 

Identity, Responsibility, and Choices: Holocaust Education for Younger Audiences

Wednesday, February 4 from 9:30 am-2:30 pm

For 5th and 6th grade educators

A study of the Holocaust is a complex undertaking. Students must be ready not only intellectually but also emotionally to understand the causes, events, and consequences of this chapter in history. In this workshop, participants will identify strategies for approaching the subject through the lens of character education, providing a framework on which students may construct meaning and begin to understand the historical context of the people, places, and events of the Holocaust by citing evidence, developing logical arguments, and synthesizing information drawn from multiple sources. Participants will also examine high-quality, age-appropriate resources and gather tools to create a meaningful introduction to the Holocaust at the 5th and 6th grade level.

Workshop Includes:
5 CPDUs
Light breakfast and vegetarian style lunch
Classroom resources and materials
Registration Fee: $10

RegisterHereButton copy

 

Content, Context, and Complicity: Teaching the Holocaust in 21st Century Classrooms

Wednesday & Thursday, February 25 & 26, 2015, 9:00 – 3:30pm

For 7th through 12th grade educators

The Illinois Holocaust Museum, in cooperation with the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum, presents a two-day professional development program that will provide teachers with resources and pedagogical approaches to teach about the Holocaust. Through an examination of historical context, engagement through the Museum’s permanent exhibition, survivor testimony and media and digital literacy, participants will learn how to approach a complex history that promotes the skills of critical thinking; exploration of different perspectives; collaborative discussion and civic literacy, empowering students to actively engage with their communities and what it means to be a responsible citizen today.

Workshop Includes:
11 CPDUs at completion of two-day program
Light breakfast and vegetarian style lunch served both days
Books and Resources provided by the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum
Registration Fee: Free

RegisterHereButton copy

 

Perpetrators and Protectors: The Holocaust in the Balkans

Thursday, April 30th 9:30-2:30pm

For 7th through 12th grade educators

The story of the Holocaust in the Balkans is complex as well as tragic. While more than 550,000 Jews from Nazi-occupied Romania, Yugoslavia, Greece, and Bulgaria were killed, the circumstances surrounding their deaths and chances for individual survival varied from country to country. Join the Illinois Holocaust Museum as we explore the historical perspectives of each country, and the complex role of perpetrators and protectors. Participants will engage in collaborative discussion and activities, promoting the skills of critical thinking; exploration of different perspectives; and learning how to empower students to actively engage with this history.

Featuring: Dr. Benjamin Frommer, Professor of History at NW University; Director of the Holocaust Education Foundation, Northwestern University.

Workshop Includes:
5 CPDUs
Light breakfast and vegetarian style lunch for day training
Classroom resources and materials
Registration Fee: $10

RegisterHereButton copy

 

 

Common Core State Standards:

The goal of the Illinois Holocaust Museum and Education Center’s Education Department is to offer the best training opportunities for teachers in grades 3-12 and to assist them in any way possible. Common Core Standards define what all students are expected to know and be able to do, not how teachers should teach. The standards lay out goals for student learning for each grade level; it is up to teachers and administrators to decide on the curriculum and teaching strategies that will help all students meet these ambitious goals. Our teacher training addresses standards in both English Language Arts and Literacy in History/Social Studies. We offer a diverse collection of instructional materials and trainings for teachers. We include the use of classroom-tested strategies and share many of the same goals as CCSS, including the ability for students to comprehend a range of challenging texts, engage in collaborative discussion, analyze the purpose of information presented in diverse formats and media, to name just a few. As a part of our interaction with educators we consistently address CCSS and we encourage teachers to identify those materials that fit their own needs for teaching about character education, the Holocaust and other genocides while helping them develop the student skills outlines in the standards, as well as skills not covered in the standards.

The Illinois Holocaust Museum is a Center of Excellence of the Jewish Foundation for the Righteous and a National Training Site for Echoes and Reflections.

 

 

FACILITY RENTAL

 
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Pinterest
  • Instagram
  • Google+
  • Museum Blog